happy as a sandboy

  The phrase (as) happy (or jolly) as a sandboy means extremely happy or carefree. A sandboy was a boy hawking sand for sale. It seems that the earliest use of the word is The Rider and Sand-boy: a Tale, the title of a poem written by a certain Mr Meyler and published in Harvest-Home in 1805: A poor shoeless urchin, half-starv’d and sun-tann’d, Went by […]

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pastiche – pastis

  pasticcio di carne – photograph: http://www.cucinafilm.it     The noun pastis designates an aniseed-flavoured aperitif, while pastiche, or pasticcio, denotes a work of art that imitates the style of another artist or period and a work of art that mixes styles, materials, etc. Unlikely as it may seem, these words are doublets, or etymological twins: […]

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to paint the town red

  Spree at Melton Mowbray. Larking at the Grantham Toll-Gate. Or Coming in for the Brush. A Society of Distinguished Painters, Who Hunt with Fox Hounds, Live Splendidly and only Paint at Night. date: unknown – by Henry Thomas Alken (1785-1851)     Of American-English origin, the colloquial phrase to paint the town red means to […]

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piping hot

  Piping Hot – Glasgow International Piping Festival. (The name has changed to Piping Live.) It is a pun, as, here, piping means playing (a tune) on bagpipes.     The adjective piping hot is used to refer to very hot food or liquid, usually when served. It referred originally to the hissing of viands in […]

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