‘Miss’-‘Ms’: origin

‘miss’: unmarried woman or girl; 17th cent., short for ‘mistress’—‘Ms’: title free of reference to marital status; 20th cent., blend of ‘Mrs’ and ‘Miss’

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meaning and origin of ‘Mrs Grundy’

from Speed the Plough (1798), by Thomas Morton; Dame Ashfield is constantly fearing to give occasion for the sneers of Mrs Grundy, her unseen neighbour

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‘to see a man about a dog’

UK, 1865—vague excuse for leaving to keep an undisclosed appointment, or, now frequently, to go to the toilet—perhaps originally with allusion to dogfighting

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meaning and origin of ‘Paul Pry’

UK, 1826—from the eponymous character played by John Liston in a comedy by John Poole, which premiered at the Haymarket Theatre, London, on 13th September 1825

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‘like watching paint dry’

USA, 1959—‘like watching paint dry’ or ‘as —— as watching paint dry’:used to denote an extremely dull activity or experience

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meanings and origin of ‘Mummerset’

UK, 1915—humorous blend of the common noun ‘mummer’ and of the name ‘Somerset’—denotes a pseudo-rustic dialect used by actors and an imaginary rustic county.

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